Wessam Bou-Assaly – How To Create Poetry

poetryWessam Bou-Assaly loves to read poetry, and enjoys talking about the subject whenever he can find someone who is equally enthusiastic about poems. Many people don’t realize that writing verses can be a liberating experience, even if someone is not especially talented.

Finding Inspiration

Finding inspiration is crucial. We can call it a muse, or anything else, but it doesn’t have to be a person. It can be a place, or even an activity, something that evokes inspiration. Once it’s there, all you have to do is feed it and work on it.

Capture a Moment

Many enthusiasts make the mistake of trying to hit the ball out of the park, trying to write a very long poem with an intricate story. A moment can often be much more powerful, conveying all the emotions that you try to summon in a brief, spontaneous poem.

Create (or Steal) a Conversation

Talking to others is a big part of the human experience, one that most people could not live without. This is probably also the reason why we so often find these conversations fascinating and inspiring. Every interaction holds some potential when it comes to writing poetry. Listening to others can have a similar effect, so walk around with open ears.

Write Often

Writing poems will require just that, writing. There are many prominent writers out there who don’t believe in the phenomenon called writer’s block. Just starting the process – even if it doesn’t result into a poetical masterpiece – can make a difference.

Wessam Bou-Assaly loves to read poems and hopes that they will make a comeback in many people’s lives.

Sources:

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides/advice/5-ways-how-to-write-a-poem

http://thewritepractice.com/enjoy-poetry/

 

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Wessam Bou-Assaly: Brain PET-CT and Dementia

 

pet-ct-brainBrain imaging with MRI, SPECT, and PET can improve diagnostic accuracy in differentiating Alzheimer Disease (AD) from potentially treatable causes of dementia such as toxic metabolic states, depression, and normal pressure hydrocephalus. When PET results are combined with clinical criteria, the false positive rate in AD can be reduced from 23% to 11%.[9] The classic pattern of AD on PET imaging is bilateral temporoparietal and posterior cingulate cortex hypometabolism; abnormal metabolism can also be seen asymmetrically, particularl yearly in the disease. Frontal lobe involvement may also be seen in later stages. The exact cause for the decline in brain glucose metabolism in AD remains unclear. Hippocampal atrophy may be seen on conventional cross-sectional imaging.

Dementia With Lewy Bodies ( DLB) is another cause of cognitive decline. Patients with DLB usually have less hippocampal atrophy than do patients with Alzheimer disease and show decreased occipital lobe blood flow or metabolism in DLB but not in Alzheimer disease.

In frontotemporal dementia, frontal and anterior temporal metabolism is predominantly decreased compared to the other types of dementia

Wessam Bou-Assaly is an experienced Neuroradiologist who practices in Ann Arbor Michigan.